Advice Column, Bonitas, Health, Pregnancy & Baby

Breastfeeding tips

  • Bonitas
  • Category Advice Column, Bonitas, Health, Pregnancy & Baby

Symptoms you may experience when not breastfeeding

The following information is to be used as a guide to and at the discretion of the end-user and should not replace a doctor’s opinion.

  • Your breasts may become sore, engorged or swollen and firm to touch.
  • You may develop a slight fever.
  • Your breasts may leak a significant amount of milk.
  • You may have some uterine bleeding during this time.
  • If you have any concerns or questions about the symptoms you experience during this time contact your doctor for more information.

Care for your breasts when not breastfeeding

The following information is to be used as a guide to and at the discretion of the end-user and should not replace a doctor’s opinion.

Try ice packs on your breast for 15-20 minutes at a time. If ice doesn’t help, try using a warm washcloth on your breasts.

Wear a well-fitting bra that is not too tight. Let your baby nurse at your breasts for a few minutes at a time.

Ask your doctor about methods to help release a small amount of milk from your breasts, which may relieve some of the discomfort.

Contact your doctor if you have any questions or concerns or you develop chills, or a fever and your breasts are still uncomfortable and swollen after 1-2 days.

Benefits of breastfeeding

The following information is to be used as a guide to and at the discretion of the end-user and should not replace a doctor’s opinion.

Breastfeeding is a skill and can take time to learn; don’t get discouraged if it’s not easy for you at first.  Breastfeeding educators are available and can be helpful in overcoming some of the hurdles.

Choosing to breastfeed your child provides many benefits for both you and your baby. Some of these include:

  • Decreased likelihood of baby getting sick from infectious diseases or having an ear infection
  • Decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer for the mother
  • Aids in faster weight loss for the mother
  • Decreased postpartum bleeding
  • Facilitates in mother-baby bonding
  • Free and environmentally friendly
  • Decreased risk of obesity for the child
  • Breastfeeding is still possible after breast surgeries, piercings and tattoos; talk to your doctor about any concerns you may have

How to breastfeed

The following information is to be used as a guide to and at the discretion of the end-user and should not replace a doctor’s opinion.

Some simple tips on how to breastfeed:

  • Find a position that is comfortable for both you and the baby; use pillows to support your arms and prop your feet up
  • Feed your baby whenever they seem hungry or show any of the hunger signs- moving head towards your chest, pulling hands near mouth or sucking noises
  • Newborns need to eat at least every 2 to 3 hours; if your baby has been sleeping for 3 to 4 hours, wake them to nurse
  • Wait to introduce a bottle or pacifier until your baby is 2 to 4 weeks old to avoid nipple confusion. Waiting much longer can create problems getting your baby to accept something other than the breast.

Keeping your breasts healthy

The following information is to be used as a guide to and at the discretion of the end-user and should not replace a doctor’s opinion.

Keeping your breasts healthy during breastfeeding is important.  Here are some things to watch for:

  • Sore nipples are normal at first; use moist warm compresses, nipple creams made for breastfeeding or a bit of fresh breast milk
  • See your doctor if soreness continues or increases, you have a swollen or red breast or if you are running a fever
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